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Can You Climb Ayers Rock Uluru



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Image of Uluru Ayers Rock.People often ask can you climb Ayers Rock. The simple answer is yes, you can climb Uluru Ayers Rock, it is not against the law to do so and many hundreds of people climb Uluru each day.

There will be times when you will not be able to climb Uluru, primarily because of safety issues and duty of care during extreme heat or inclement weather periods.

Climbing Uluru is high on the list of things to do for many who come to Ayers Rock. This tour takes you to sunrise viewing area for breakfast, then guides you to start point for Uluru Climb.

Climbing Ayers Rock is unguided at own risk. The indiginous owners of Uluru would prefer you not to make the climb, as it crosses the path of their ancestors.

However, the choice of climbing to the top of Ulura was written into Australian law when the land was officially signed over to the original owners.

Those who choose to climb Ayers Rock are treated to the most magnificent views of the surrounding desert. It is like climbing to the top of a 95 story building, so be prepared for a hard but rewarding challenge.

The Aboriginal owners ask tourists to consider their beliefs and not take the climb.

There are signs stating the reasons why you should consider not climbing Uluru near the departure trail. You decide once you have read all the available material, it is entirely your decision.

To the Anangu people, Uluru is a sacred place steeped in Dreamtime legend and climbing Uluru will break with their traditions.

There are other factors also that you should consider before attempting to climb Ayers Rock. Are you in reasonable fitness, as the Rock is very steep and the climb extremely strenuous. Will the weather be too hot or conditions unsuitable? Around 35 people have died attempting to climb Uluru, most of heart attack.

If anytime you change your mind about climbing Ayers Rock, you can join guided tours around the base of Uluru instead. Climbing Ayers Rock is unguided and is totally at your own risk.